Category Archives: Lebanon

Tragic death of Syrian baby in Lebanon

Caritas Lebanon provides healthcare to Syrian refugees through mobile clinics. Credit: Evert-Jan Daniels/CORDAID

Caritas Lebanon provides healthcare to Syrian refugees through mobile clinics. Credit: Evert-Jan Daniels/CORDAID

By Caritas Lebanon Migrants Centre

The parents of 8-month old Amjad Aalawayn came to the Caritas Lebanon Migrant Centre in Zahle in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon on Wednesday 3 April looking for help for their sick baby. The family were Syrian refugees, fleeing the fighting in their country. The baby was pale, listless and had no appetite.

They came to Caritas after one hospital had refused to admit Amjad because of money issues. A Caritas social worker contacted a paediatrician to transfer him to a hospital, but sadly he passed away while waiting for medical assistance.

Our social worker contacted the hospital where he was transferred, whereby they confirmed the death of 8-month old Amjad. No cause of death was declared as was dead on arrival. May this angel’s soul rest in peace, a peace he certainly didn’t find in here.

Many sick children have been referred to Caritas from the same camp with similar symptoms.  Syrian refugees don’t get enough medical assistance.

Najla Chahda, Director of Caritas Lebanon Migrant Centre, said, “There is an urgent need to provide medical assistance for these children quickly. We hope that a solution would be found soon to all Syrian refugees and put an end to their suffering.

UPDATE

Today, the Caritas team went on-site to check the situation in the settlement where Amjad’s family is living. It seems that one child was diagnosed with tuberculosis and discharged from hospital where he stayed for two days, due to lack of money. There are lots of children and adults showing mild similar symptoms, but at least six children and two to three adults are sick.

We immediately notified the IMC team who promised to go on field immediately. We fear an outbreak of this highly contagious disease, especially when considering the deplorable sanitary conditions experienced by the refugees living in this location.

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Lebanon buckling under influx of refugees

This Syrian family was taken in by relatives in the Lebanese town of Baalbek. Photo: Jos de Voogd/Cordaid

This Syrian family was taken in by relatives in the Lebanese town of Baalbek. Photo: Jos de Voogd/Cordaid

By Jos de Vogd, CORDAID (Caritas Netherlands)

After two years of fighting in Syria, the flow of refugees into neighbouring Lebanon is increasing the pressure on this small country by the day. According to recent government figures, more than a million Syrians are now in Lebanon. And every week more than 10,000 more displaced people, all looking for accommodation, are adding to the problem because there are no official refugee camps there.

The numbers include refugees registered or waiting to be registered with the UN refuge agency UNHCR. But they also include people who are either not willing to register as well as seasonal workers who didn’t return to Syria because of the civil war, instead persuading their families to join them in Lebanon. Also included are Palestinian refugees from Syria and Lebanon who were permanently living in Syria. At the moment, one in five people in Lebanon come from Syria.

There are refugees in over 900 locations across Lebanon. It’s making it difficult for the UN and aid agencies to reach those affected. So far, the Lebanese government is divided as to whether it should allow official refugee camps, one of the reasons being that Lebanon has struggled with a large number of Palestinian refugees for many years.

The need for affordable accommodation is very pressing. In the north of the country and throughout the Bekaa valley on the Syrian border, refugees are living in makeshift tents, barns, rooms and apartments, or with Lebanese families who have taken them in. And quite often they have to pay for this hospitality because after two years the local people have had enough. Rents and the prices of building materials have risen sharply.

The Syrian family of 81-year-old Mrs. Souad count themselves lucky. The family, totaling 11 people, including Mrs. Souad’s two daughters, their children and three great grandchildren, found accommodation in the small city of Baalbek. They are staying free-of-charge with a third daughter and her Lebanese husband. The Souads are a relatively affluent family as many of them worked as teachers in Syria.

However, their homes in the Syrian city of Homs were destroyed and because they have not been able to find work in Lebanon they are dependent on the income of their host family and on food vouchers handed out by aid organisations. Every person, irrespective of age, receives a monthly food voucher worth US$30.

The Souad family has been in Lebanon for a year now. “Initially the Lebanese were very welcoming but that welcome has now evaporated. Every day we are told that we are stealing their jobs,” said Raphde, one of the daughters.

In the meantime, the continuing unrest means tourism in Lebanon has all but collapsed. Hotels in the north of the country, as well as those in its skiing resorts, are empty.

At the current rate of refugee influx there will be two million refugees in Lebanon by the end of the year.

And if the “battle for Damascus” flares up, one million refugees could materialize in just 48 hours. Pro- and anti-Assad factions have been fighting for several months in the Lebanese coastal city of Tripoli, and there are fears that the fighting will spill over to other areas. Meanwhile, aid organisations are struggling to get financing for their aid programs and the appeal of the UN has been subscribed by just 30 percent.

Whichever scenario follows, the pressure on the fragile Lebanese society is increasing and, as a result, there is a real fear of local escalation.

This article first appeared on the CORDAID blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Life is hard for Syrian refugees in the Lebanese winter

Au camp de Majd el Anjar, dans la vallée de la Beeka, s’est installée une centaine de personnes originaires de Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Au camp de Majd el Anjar, dans la vallée de la Beeka, s’est installée une centaine de personnes originaires de Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

By Marina Bellot, Secours Catholique/Caritas France

Life is increasingly difficult for Syrian refugees in Lebanon now winter has come. However, Caritas Lebanon is by their side.

Syrians who cross the border to Lebanon are looking for one thing for themselves and their families : to live in peace. Some 132,000 Syrian refugees have been registered by the UN refugee agency since the brutal conflict began in their country. Eighty percent are women and children who have fled, leaving behind their homes, their lives and their loved ones, who they sometimes later discover were killed in the war.

Once across the border, some refugees are taken in by host families, particularly in the north of Lebanon where there are strong ties between the two peoples. Others rent small rooms which are sometimes home to more than a dozen people. But with the conflict entering its second year, the welcome is wearing out and in some places it’s impossible to find a bed. For those less fortunate, the only choice is to take refuge in a camp. These are plots of land where the refugees can put up a tent or shelter for a few dollars a month.

Survival through solidarity

“Winter is the big problem now,” says Kamal Sioufi, from Caritas Lebanon Migrant Centre. In the Bekaa Valley, where most of the refugees are staying, temperatures regularly drop below zero at night and heating oil is expensive. Oil for one day’s heating can cost US$6. How can people afford that if they only earn US$15 a day? With funding from Secours Catholique, Caritas Lebanon has launched a project to provide wood stoves and tarpaulins to protect tents from the rain and cold.

Many of the refugees have great difficulty in covering their basic needs. Life is much more expensive in Lebanon than in Syria and work is hard to come by, especially in winter. The men find odd jobs either in farming or building, but rarely for more than ten days a month, this means US$150 a month to live on for the luckiest – just enough to pay the rent. To cover the rest of their needs, people have to rely on charity: people giving them furniture or a mattress or lending them money when they need it; or on humanitarian agencies such as Caritas Lebanon giving them food and hygiene kits.

Syrian children at school

The Lebanese government doesn’t give material help to the refugees but does offer free renewal of the refugees’ residence permits. Above all, it is allowing Syrian children to go to Lebanon’s state schools …for a fee of US$100, plus school materials and the bus fare to get to school. The cost of all this is impossible for most families so Caritas funds school fees and materials and gives Syrian children support in doing their homework.

Apart from all of the material difficulties of the refugees’ lives, they are facing a level of suffering which cannot be alleviated. There’s the physical suffering of injuries from the war or poor living and hygiene conditions. There’s low morale caused by the atrocities they’ve seen, the loss of their homes and the on-going fear that they’ll lose their loved ones who are still in Syria. No one knows when this is all going to end, but everyone hopes to return home soon.

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Je veux la liberté dans ma vie

Hoda, 35 ans, enseignait l’anglais à Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Hoda, 35 ans, enseignait l’anglais à Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Par Marina Bellot, Secours Catholique

Dans la plaine agricole de la Bekaa, à l’est du pays, des centaines de tentes ont fait leur apparition. Là vivent les Syriens qui ont fui leur pays, souvent sans rien emporter. Parmi eux, Hoda, 35 ans, qui a retrouvé les membres de sa famille dans le camp Majd el Anjar.

Depuis un mois, Hoda n’a plus l’occasion de pratiquer l’anglais. Cette femme professeur de 35 ans qui enseignait dans un lycée privé de Homs a dû fuir les bombes qui s’abattent sur la ville. Avec son mari et ses cinq enfants, Hoda a rejoint la centaine de membres de sa famille qui ont posé leurs tentes sur ce bout de terrain perdu au milieu des cultures de la plaine de la Bekaa. Elle qui s’est faite la porte-parole de la famille tient à témoigner de la difficulté du quotidien… En anglais.

« En Syrie, on ne savait pas qui étaient nos ennemis. A Homs, les rues étaient remplies de cadavres, certains décapités, qui restaient là plusieurs jours de suite. J’ai appris qu’une de mes élèves avait été violée pendant 6 jours puis assassinée. Le jour où j’ai vu une femme tuée devant mes yeux, je suis partie. Nous avons beaucoup souffert. Tout le monde a besoin d’une aide psychologique ici, surtout les enfants. Quand ils entendent les tirs des chasseurs libanais, ils sont terrorisés.

Ici, nous sommes en sécurité, mais nous avons tout laissé derrière nous. Nous vivons dans des conditions très difficiles. Les journées se ressemblent : le matin je me lève tôt, les enfants vont à l’école et moi je vais dans la tente de mon frère, plus confortable que la mienne, pour me réchauffer et cuisiner. Mon mari, lui, essaie de trouver du travail selon le temps qu’il fait. S’il pleut, il ne trouve rien, sinon, il a une chance. La plupart du temps, il récolte des pommes de terre pour 10 dollars par jour. A Homs, il était électricien et gagnait bien sa vie.

Jusqu’à trente personnes dorment sous la même tente. Dans la mienne, nous sommes sept. C’est humide et nous n’avons pas de chauffage. Avant, j’avais un appartement avec trois chambres, une vraie cuisine, une machine à laver… Ma vie était facile. Ici il n’y a pas de toilettes, et nous avons à peine de quoi manger. Tous les trois jours, nous allons chercher un gallon d’eau (3,7 litres, Ndlr) à la ferme à côté. Le propriétaire est un Libanais, mais l’exploitant est un Syrien qui accepte de nous aider en ne nous faisant pas payer. Avec un gallon, on doit tout faire : boire, se laver, laver les légumes, les vêtements… Ce Syrien nous donne aussi des légumes que nous cuisinons.

Ici, dans le camp, nous sommes tous révolutionnaires. Nous ne voulons plus d’un système dictatorial. Je suis une femme libre, je veux la liberté dans ma vie. Si la guerre s’arrête, nous retournerons à Homs sans hésitation, pour dormir dans nos lits. J’espère revoir un jour un Homs libre. »

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Europe, Français, France, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Nouveaux arrivants à Bourj el-Barajneh, le camp palestinien le plus peuplé du Liban

Près de 20 000 réfugiés occupent le camp palestinien de Bourj el-Barajneh, au sud de Beyrouth. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Près de 20 000 réfugiés occupent le camp palestinien de Bourj el-Barajneh, au sud de Beyrouth. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Par Marina Bellot, Secours Catholique

Près de 500 000 Palestiniens vivent dans des camps au Liban. Depuis le début du conflit, les Palestiniens qui fuient la Syrie viennent grossir la population du camp de Bourj el-Barajneh, le plus peuplé du pays.

Il faut se faufiler dans un dédale de ruelles, certaines totalement plongées dans le noir, pour parvenir jusqu’au petit local qu’occupe l’association Who, soutenue par Caritas, qui aide les femmes les plus défavorisées du camp de Bourj el-Barajneh, au sud de Beyrouth. L’une des responsables de l’association nous guide dans ce monde sombre, humide et oppressant, à quelques encablures du centre huppé de la capitale.

C’est en 1948, lors de la création de l’Etat d’Israël, que les premiers Palestiniens en exil ont posé le pied dans ce quartier de la banlieue de Beyrouth. Année après année, la population a explosé avec l’arrivée successive des Libanais les plus pauvres, puis de Syriens, d’Egyptiens, d’Irakiens… Depuis le début du conflit en Syrie, de nouveaux arrivants viennent densifier encore le camp, qui abrite près de 20 000 personnes dans un périmètre d’à peine un kilomètre carré. Ici, l’eau n’est pas potable, et l’électricité ne fonctionne que quelques heures par jour. L’enchevêtrement spectaculaire de fils électriques nus menacent en permanence la vie des habitants. Il y a quelques mois, l’inévitable est arrivé : un enfant, un de plus, est mort électrocuté.
Le désarroi au quotidien

L’anarchie qui a présidé à la construction du camp fait aussi craindre le pire, tant les maisons délabrées sont empilées les unes sur les autres. Les habitants y sont privés de la lumière du jour. «  Regardez dans quoi on vit », s’indigne Rasmyeh, 64 ans, en montrant la petite fenêtre sans carreaux et les murs pelés par l’humidité. Depuis 5 mois elle habite ici avec ses trois filles, son fils et leurs enfants. Douze personnes au total, qui se partagent deux pièces sombres et froides. Avant d’emménager ici, ils vivaient dans le camp palestinien de Yarmouk, près de Damas, devenu le théâtre de violents combats entre opposants et partisans du régime. Bien sûr, ce n’était pas le luxe. Mais c’était chez eux, insiste Rasmyeh. Au Liban, dit-elle, tout est cher. Inaccessible. Quelques voisins l’ont bien aidée en la dépannant d’un tapis et de quelques chaises en plastique. Mais manger à sa faim tous les jours est une autre affaire. Depuis son arrivée ici, elle dit n’avoir reçu qu’un colis alimentaire du Hamas, et deux autres d’ONG. «  Les associations donnent aux Syriens, mais pas aux Palestiniens de Syrie, se désole Rasmyeh. Quand les enfants ont faim et que je ne peux pas leur donner à manger, ça me fait trop mal ». Ce désarroi, la population du camp, marquée par les conflits, minée par la pauvreté, découragée par l’absence de perspectives, le subit au quotidien. Fin 2008, Médecins sans Frontières a mis en place un programme d’aide mentale dans le camp, dont ont bénéficié plus de 1 000 habitants. Dépression, anxiété, psychoses, désordres bipolaires, troubles de la personnalité – autant de maladies fréquemment diagnostiquées par MSF.

Najham, comme tant d’autres ici, se sent « stressée ». La jeune fille de 20 ans, dont les cernes bleutées soulignent l’épuisement, est arrivée ici il y a trois mois, quand les combats se sont dangereusement approchés de sa maison en Syrie. Avec sa mère et sa sœur enceinte, elle a rejoint sa grand-mère Amira, qui habite le camp depuis 1948. « Je ne pourrai pas m’intégrer ici, tout est trop différent, estime Najham. En Syrie, j’allais au restaurant, dans les magasins. Ici je ne connais personne et on n’a pas d’argent pour sortir ». Alors, pour se donner du courage, elle pense à la Syrie. La vie qu’elle y a laissée. La vie qu’elle espère retrouver au plus vite.

Marina Bellot

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Europe, France, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Les réfugiés syriens éprouvés par l’hiver

Au camp de Majd el Anjar, dans la vallée de la Beeka, s’est installée une centaine de personnes originaires de Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Au camp de Majd el Anjar, dans la vallée de la Beeka, s’est installée une centaine de personnes originaires de Homs. Copyright: Secours Catholique/Patrick Delapierre

Par Marina Bellot, Secours Catholique

Alors que l’hiver sévit au Liban, le quotidien des 132 000 Syriens qui y ont trouvé refuge est de plus en plus difficile. Caritas Liban est à leur côté.

Vivre en paix. Voilà ce qui anime ces Syriens qui, chaque jour, passent la frontière pour mettre leur famille à l’abri. Depuis le début du conflit qui ensanglante leur pays, ils sont 132 000 à s’être enregistrés au Haut Commissariat pour les Réfugiés (UNHCR) – sans doute bien plus à avoir rejoint le Liban en réalité. Parmi eux, 80% sont des femmes et des enfants, qui ont bien souvent dû fuir précipitamment, laissant derrière eux leur maison, leur vie, mais aussi des proches, dont ils apprendront parfois la mort quelques jours ou quelques semaines plus tard.

Une fois la frontière franchie, certains arrivants sont hébergés au sein de familles d’accueil, notamment au nord du Liban, où les liens sont forts entre Syriens et Libanais. D’autres louent de petites pièces dans lesquelles ils doivent parfois vivre à plus d’une dizaine. Mais, alors que la crise syrienne entre dans sa deuxième année, de nombreuses familles ont désormais dépassé leur capacité d’accueil, et dans certaines villes il est devenu impossible de trouver une quelconque location. Alors, les plus défavorisés, les moins chanceux, n’ont d’autres choix que de s’installer dans des « camps », ces terrains loués à des Libanais où les familles réfugiées peuvent, pour quelques dollars par mois, planter des tentes ou construire des abris rudimentaires.

La solidarité, seul moyen de survie

«  L’hiver est désormais le problème crucial », souligne Kamal Sioufi, président du comité directeur du Centre des Migrants de Caritas Liban. Dans la Bekaa, la grande plaine agricole qui abrite la majorité des réfugiés, le thermomètre descend régulièrement sous la barre du zéro la nuit, et le mazout coûte cher : comment payer 6 dollars par jour pour se chauffer, quand une journée de travail en rapporte 15 ? Pour parer à l’urgence, Caritas Liban, soutenue financièrement par le Secours Catholique, vient de lancer un programme de distribution de poêles à bois et de bâches en plastique pour protéger les tentes de la pluie et du froid.

Qu’ils vivent dans les camps ou ailleurs, l’immense majorité des réfugiés a le plus grand mal à subvenir à ses besoins. La vie est bien plus chère ici qu’en Syrie, et le travail se fait rare, surtout en hiver. Les hommes occupent de petits emplois de journaliers en plein air, dans l’agriculture ou le bâtiment, rarement plus d’une dizaine de jours par mois. Le calcul est vite fait : à 15 dollars la journée en moyenne, ce sont 150 dollars gagnés à la fin du mois pour les plus chanceux – tout juste de quoi payer un loyer. Le reste, c’est la solidarité qui y pourvoit. Celle des proches, qui dépannent de quelques meubles ou prêtent un peu d’argent au gré des besoins. Celle des Libanais, qui donnent ici un matelas, là une télévision. Celle des ONG enfin : Caritas Liban distribue colis alimentaires, kits d’hygiène et couvertures à 6000 familles dans le besoin – un chiffre en constante augmentation.

Les enfants syriens sur le chemin de l’école

L’Etat libanais, quant à lui, ne fournit aucune aide matérielle, mais a accédé aux demandes des ONG de rendre gratuit le renouvellement des permis de résidence des réfugiés. Surtout, il a accepté d’ouvrir les écoles publiques aux élèves syriens. Reste qu’il faut pouvoir débourser les 100 dollars que coûte l’inscription, acheter les fournitures scolaires, payer le trajet en bus des enfants… Impossible pour la plupart des familles. Là encore, Caritas leur vient en aide, en finançant les fournitures et en avançant au besoin les frais d’inscription. La difficulté ne s’arrête toutefois pas là : au Liban, les matières scientifiques sont enseignées en français, une langue dont la plupart des petits Syriens ignorent tout, eux qui ont jusque-là étudié en arabe. Les programmes d’aide aux devoirs mis en place par Caritas Liban accueillent de plus en plus d’enfants syriens.

Au-delà des difficultés matérielles, il y a la souffrance, impossible à soulager. Souffrance physique, qu’elle soit due aux blessures de guerre ou aux mauvaises conditions de vie et d’hygiène. Souffrance morale, liée au souvenir des atrocités de la guerre, au déracinement forcé, à la peur de perdre des proches restés au pays. Nul ne sait quand cette vie de privation et de douleur prendra fin, mais tous espèrent rentrer chez eux au plus vite. Et qu’importe si tout est à reconstruire.

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Europe, France, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Refugees, Syria

Syria: “A tragedy unfolding in front of our eyes”

Michel Roy, secretary general of Caritas Internationalis, has appealed to world leaders to get involved politically and diplomatically in the world’s worst humanitarian crises.

He singled out the conflict in Syria as needing particular attention from the international community: “What is happening in Syria is a big tragedy which is unfolding in front of our eyes and something has to be done.”

He was speaking at the UN World Food Programme in Rome. He was there to launch a massive global appeal with Valerie Amos, UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator. The US$8.5 billion appeal will help an estimated 51 million people around the world in 2013.

Read more about the appeal.

Leave a comment

Filed under Conflicts and Disasters, Emergencies, Emergencies in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Middle East & North Africa, Peacebuilding, Syria